maxomai: dog (Default)
Three Hands Press says:

Forthcoming in June...

Announcement of a new magical work by Robert Fitzgerald, illuminated by the eldritch woodcuts of our own Liv Rainey Smith.


Stay tuned, kids.
maxomai: dog (Default)
Three Hands Press says:

Forthcoming in June...

Announcement of a new magical work by Robert Fitzgerald, illuminated by the eldritch woodcuts of our own Liv Rainey Smith.


Stay tuned, kids.
maxomai: dog (Default)
This is more amusing than anything else: one of Gaddafi's palaces was taken over by protesters and they found several "witchcraft and sorcery" books in his collection. Al Jazeera broadcast footage of these books, which is included below:



I don't read Arabic, but I was lucky enough to get a translation from the very kind @MaissAl. According to her, the titles are:

1- The Talmud
2- Qabalah and Magic
3- Alliance of Satan *politics Mafia and religions Mafia* Author: abdulhaq alhur.
4- 72 secrets in Jewish mysticism
5- Facts about reincarnation and The Sixth Sense author: Dr. Kamal Othman bek .
6- Spirits and ghosts * Modern spiritual [ Lies and Facts ] .


So yeah...the Talmud is the Talmud, Qabalah is Qabalah, and the Mafia book could be interesting to a scholar if it is well researched. The rest just look like junk. It's the kind of stuff I'd find in a local new age bookstore.

Except, of course, that these titles were found in the library of a brutal monster.
maxomai: dog (Default)
This is more amusing than anything else: one of Gaddafi's palaces was taken over by protesters and they found several "witchcraft and sorcery" books in his collection. Al Jazeera broadcast footage of these books, which is included below:



I don't read Arabic, but I was lucky enough to get a translation from the very kind @MaissAl. According to her, the titles are:

1- The Talmud
2- Qabalah and Magic
3- Alliance of Satan *politics Mafia and religions Mafia* Author: abdulhaq alhur.
4- 72 secrets in Jewish mysticism
5- Facts about reincarnation and The Sixth Sense author: Dr. Kamal Othman bek .
6- Spirits and ghosts * Modern spiritual [ Lies and Facts ] .


So yeah...the Talmud is the Talmud, Qabalah is Qabalah, and the Mafia book could be interesting to a scholar if it is well researched. The rest just look like junk. It's the kind of stuff I'd find in a local new age bookstore.

Except, of course, that these titles were found in the library of a brutal monster.
maxomai: (typewriter guy wtf)
Two of SC's prints, Shub Niggurath and Coagulation, are in S p o o l #4 of SilKMilK (just announced here -- check it out, it's freaking gorgeous).
maxomai: (typewriter guy wtf)
Two of SC's prints, Shub Niggurath and Coagulation, are in S p o o l #4 of SilKMilK (just announced here -- check it out, it's freaking gorgeous).

On Atheism

Jan. 26th, 2007 09:06 am
maxomai: dog (Default)
Spirituality, the sense of the sacred, faith, belief in the existence of God, religion as ideology, religion as system and as institution -- all are very different notions and do not necessarily intersect, and they are no longer univocal. There are religions that do not have any God (Taoism, for example); belief in God does not necessarily imply belief in a personal God. On the other hand, to imagine that all religious concerns could be permanently removed from mankind is, in our eyes, pure fantasy. Faith is neither repression nor illusion, and the best human reason can do is recognize that reason alone is not sufficient to exhaust all man's inner aspirations. As Schopenhauer observes: "Man is the only being who is astonished by his own existence; a brute animal lives in its tranquillity and is astonished by nothing ... This astonishment, which occurs especially in the face of death and in view of the destruction and disappearance of all other beings, is the source of our metaphysical needs; it is because of this that man is a metaphysical animal." The need for the sacred is a fundamental human need, in the same way as food or copulation. (If some choose to forgo any of these, so much better for them.) Mircea Eliade notes that "the experience of the sacred is a structure of consciousness," which one cannot hope to do without. Man needs some belief or some religion -- we distinguish here religion from ethics -- as ritual, as actions that comfort him by their unvarying regularity, forming part of the habitual patterns by which he is constructed. In this respect, the recent appearance of genuine disbelief is among those phenomena of decline that are destructuring man in what makes him distinctively human. (Is the man who has lost the capacity or the desire to believe still a man? One can at least pose the the question.)

"It is possible," Régis Debray writes, "to have a society without God; it is not possible to have a society without religion." He adds: "States on the way to disbelief are also on the way to abdication." George Bataille's remarks are also pertinent: "Religion, the essence of which is the search for a lost intimacy, is essentially an effort of the clear consciousness to become entirely self-awareness." That is enough to condemn Western liberalism. We would certainly give Judeo-Christianity too much credit if we rejected all the concepts over which it claims a monopoly simply because it has claimed them. We need not reject the idea of God or the concept of the sacred simply because of the sickly form in which Christianity has expressed them, any more than we must break with aristocratic principles simply because they have been caricatured by the bourgeoisie.

We should note as well that in pre-Christian antiquity the word "atheism" is practically meaningless. Ancient trials for "unbelief" or "impiety" are generally concerned, in reality, with other offenses. When the pagan historian Ammianus Marcellinus remarks that "there are some people for whom the sky is empty of gods," he specifies that they do believe, nevertheless, in magic and in the stars. In Rome it was the Christians who were accused of "atheism," since they showed no respect to images of the gods or to places of worship. In Greece, rational thought itself only reoriented theogony and mythical cosmology. That is why Claude Tresmontant, after having gratuitously likened pantheism to "atheism," is compelled to write that the latter is "eminently religious," that in fact "it is far too religious, since it unduly divinizes the universe." In ancient Europe, the sacred was not conceived in opposition to the profane, but rather embraced the profane and gave it meaning. There was no need for a Church to mediate between man and God; the whole city itself effected this mediation, and religious institutions constituted only one aspect of it. The conceptual antonym of Latin religio would be the verb negligere. To be religious is to be responsible, not to neglect. To be responsible is to be free -- to possess the concrete means of exercising a practical liberty. To be free is also, at the same time, to be connected to others through a common spirituality.

-- From Alain de Benoist, The Path Toward The Sacred

On Atheism

Jan. 26th, 2007 09:06 am
maxomai: dog (Default)
Spirituality, the sense of the sacred, faith, belief in the existence of God, religion as ideology, religion as system and as institution -- all are very different notions and do not necessarily intersect, and they are no longer univocal. There are religions that do not have any God (Taoism, for example); belief in God does not necessarily imply belief in a personal God. On the other hand, to imagine that all religious concerns could be permanently removed from mankind is, in our eyes, pure fantasy. Faith is neither repression nor illusion, and the best human reason can do is recognize that reason alone is not sufficient to exhaust all man's inner aspirations. As Schopenhauer observes: "Man is the only being who is astonished by his own existence; a brute animal lives in its tranquillity and is astonished by nothing ... This astonishment, which occurs especially in the face of death and in view of the destruction and disappearance of all other beings, is the source of our metaphysical needs; it is because of this that man is a metaphysical animal." The need for the sacred is a fundamental human need, in the same way as food or copulation. (If some choose to forgo any of these, so much better for them.) Mircea Eliade notes that "the experience of the sacred is a structure of consciousness," which one cannot hope to do without. Man needs some belief or some religion -- we distinguish here religion from ethics -- as ritual, as actions that comfort him by their unvarying regularity, forming part of the habitual patterns by which he is constructed. In this respect, the recent appearance of genuine disbelief is among those phenomena of decline that are destructuring man in what makes him distinctively human. (Is the man who has lost the capacity or the desire to believe still a man? One can at least pose the the question.)

"It is possible," Régis Debray writes, "to have a society without God; it is not possible to have a society without religion." He adds: "States on the way to disbelief are also on the way to abdication." George Bataille's remarks are also pertinent: "Religion, the essence of which is the search for a lost intimacy, is essentially an effort of the clear consciousness to become entirely self-awareness." That is enough to condemn Western liberalism. We would certainly give Judeo-Christianity too much credit if we rejected all the concepts over which it claims a monopoly simply because it has claimed them. We need not reject the idea of God or the concept of the sacred simply because of the sickly form in which Christianity has expressed them, any more than we must break with aristocratic principles simply because they have been caricatured by the bourgeoisie.

We should note as well that in pre-Christian antiquity the word "atheism" is practically meaningless. Ancient trials for "unbelief" or "impiety" are generally concerned, in reality, with other offenses. When the pagan historian Ammianus Marcellinus remarks that "there are some people for whom the sky is empty of gods," he specifies that they do believe, nevertheless, in magic and in the stars. In Rome it was the Christians who were accused of "atheism," since they showed no respect to images of the gods or to places of worship. In Greece, rational thought itself only reoriented theogony and mythical cosmology. That is why Claude Tresmontant, after having gratuitously likened pantheism to "atheism," is compelled to write that the latter is "eminently religious," that in fact "it is far too religious, since it unduly divinizes the universe." In ancient Europe, the sacred was not conceived in opposition to the profane, but rather embraced the profane and gave it meaning. There was no need for a Church to mediate between man and God; the whole city itself effected this mediation, and religious institutions constituted only one aspect of it. The conceptual antonym of Latin religio would be the verb negligere. To be religious is to be responsible, not to neglect. To be responsible is to be free -- to possess the concrete means of exercising a practical liberty. To be free is also, at the same time, to be connected to others through a common spirituality.

-- From Alain de Benoist, The Path Toward The Sacred
maxomai: dog (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] throwingstardna pointed out this editorial by Jay Bakker, a New York pastor, author of Son of a Preacher Man, and son of Jim and Tammy Fae Bakker:

What the hell happened? Where did we go wrong? How was Christianity co-opted by a political party? Why are Christians supporting laws that force others to live by their standards?


Well, for my part, I think this happened, and that what we're seeing today is a desperate attempt to keep the new aeon at bay. Unfortunately, the old aeon became everything they feared in the new aeon as a result: oppressive, authoritarian, plutocratic, representitive of might-is-right, and dangerously irrational. They've embraced the very fascism they thought the spread of the occult would usher in, and have replaced Christianity as a result.

Eventually, you have to either let it go or get torn apart. Which is it going to be?
maxomai: dog (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] throwingstardna pointed out this editorial by Jay Bakker, a New York pastor, author of Son of a Preacher Man, and son of Jim and Tammy Fae Bakker:

What the hell happened? Where did we go wrong? How was Christianity co-opted by a political party? Why are Christians supporting laws that force others to live by their standards?


Well, for my part, I think this happened, and that what we're seeing today is a desperate attempt to keep the new aeon at bay. Unfortunately, the old aeon became everything they feared in the new aeon as a result: oppressive, authoritarian, plutocratic, representitive of might-is-right, and dangerously irrational. They've embraced the very fascism they thought the spread of the occult would usher in, and have replaced Christianity as a result.

Eventually, you have to either let it go or get torn apart. Which is it going to be?
maxomai: dog (Default)
Pluto has been voted out of the definition of a planet by an international committee of astronomers.

I'm waiting for astrologers to come up with some kind of explanation for why this doesn't screw with the system.
maxomai: dog (Default)
Pluto has been voted out of the definition of a planet by an international committee of astronomers.

I'm waiting for astrologers to come up with some kind of explanation for why this doesn't screw with the system.
maxomai: (angry-penguin)
Since folks are hashing this out on lj, I figure I'd better throw in on lj.

Let us consider this entanglement as a magickal operation. You are the magician and you see all this crap going down around you.

How is the operation going?

Are there signs of having evoked some qlippothic forces?

Might you try something different? Make some adjustments?

Comments disabled. Use my nick at gmail.

Addendum The only thing I'm going to add to this is that I consider everyone involved in this mess a brother. For me to comment further requires much more information than I believe I'm going to get.
maxomai: (angry-penguin)
Since folks are hashing this out on lj, I figure I'd better throw in on lj.

Let us consider this entanglement as a magickal operation. You are the magician and you see all this crap going down around you.

How is the operation going?

Are there signs of having evoked some qlippothic forces?

Might you try something different? Make some adjustments?

Comments disabled. Use my nick at gmail.

Addendum The only thing I'm going to add to this is that I consider everyone involved in this mess a brother. For me to comment further requires much more information than I believe I'm going to get.
maxomai: dog (dog)
I just ordered my copy of The Blue Equinox from Amazon. I'll let you all know when it arrives!
maxomai: dog (dog)
I just ordered my copy of The Blue Equinox from Amazon. I'll let you all know when it arrives!
maxomai: dog (Default)
...go here.

Keep in mind, I think TDC makes some very interesting points about esoteric geometry and other bits of occult symbolism; I'd definitely recommend it to Thelemites for this reason. Just so long as everyone realizes it's a work of fiction.
maxomai: dog (Default)
...go here.

Keep in mind, I think TDC makes some very interesting points about esoteric geometry and other bits of occult symbolism; I'd definitely recommend it to Thelemites for this reason. Just so long as everyone realizes it's a work of fiction.
maxomai: dog (Default)
The guy who founded Domino's Pizza wants to build a town based on strict Roman Catholic principles -- in particular, one in which birth control, abortion services, and pornography will not be available.

I'm not sure he could get away with it, but on the other hand, there may be a market for this kind of thing. If there is, I propose we build Thelemaville.

What kind of town is Thelemaville? Well:

  • You can basically sell, eat, drink, say, do, or produce whatever the hell you want.
  • Local law enforcement shall be encouraged to issue letters of good report for Class III transfer stamps.
  • There will be, at a minimum, one of each of the following: high-quality beer and wine shop (think Liquid Solutions), gun range, hobby shop (for models, RPGs and such), dojo, occult book store, high-quality food mart, fabric store, sporting goods store, blacksmith, custom jeweler, full-service Planned Parenthood center, community radio station.
  • Notwithstanding the above, there will not be a television station, movie theater, video rental shop, or any other business that primarily encourages passive entertainment.
  • Town hall meetings will start with reciting the following: "I will know my own Will. I will do my own Will. I will rejoice in the Will of my God."
  • The closer to Thunder Ranch, the better. (OK, maybe that's not so important -- but it would be really cool.)


Of course, the downside of this is that it would require Thelemites to, you know, take the project seriously. This isn't always our strong suit.
maxomai: dog (Default)
The guy who founded Domino's Pizza wants to build a town based on strict Roman Catholic principles -- in particular, one in which birth control, abortion services, and pornography will not be available.

I'm not sure he could get away with it, but on the other hand, there may be a market for this kind of thing. If there is, I propose we build Thelemaville.

What kind of town is Thelemaville? Well:

  • You can basically sell, eat, drink, say, do, or produce whatever the hell you want.
  • Local law enforcement shall be encouraged to issue letters of good report for Class III transfer stamps.
  • There will be, at a minimum, one of each of the following: high-quality beer and wine shop (think Liquid Solutions), gun range, hobby shop (for models, RPGs and such), dojo, occult book store, high-quality food mart, fabric store, sporting goods store, blacksmith, custom jeweler, full-service Planned Parenthood center, community radio station.
  • Notwithstanding the above, there will not be a television station, movie theater, video rental shop, or any other business that primarily encourages passive entertainment.
  • Town hall meetings will start with reciting the following: "I will know my own Will. I will do my own Will. I will rejoice in the Will of my God."
  • The closer to Thunder Ranch, the better. (OK, maybe that's not so important -- but it would be really cool.)


Of course, the downside of this is that it would require Thelemites to, you know, take the project seriously. This isn't always our strong suit.

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